Saturday, October 16, 2010

Make your Arduino talk, sing, and zap!

We blogged about the Speakjet chip previously, but here is a snap on shield with all the hard work done for you, you can concentrate on creatively assembling speech, sound effects, and tones to your hearts content.



http://sites.google.com/a/droidbuilder.com/www/home/SpeakJetShield

Friday, October 15, 2010

Arduino Shield Database

A master list of plugin "shields" for the Arduino family. Everything from display shields, ethernet, wifi, even sound and data logging. Over 100 and still increasing. Check it out!



Sick of trying to figure out which pins are used by some obscure Arduinoshield? Can't tell whether two shields will be compatible with each other?

This shield database arose out of a discussion on the Arduino Forums about the need for a comprehensive online reference for shield pin assignments. It lists as many Arduino shields as I can find along with their pin usage, making it easy for you to determine if particular shields are compatible.
 http://www.shieldlist.org/

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Free Arduino UNO!

In cooperation with Hacktronics.com, we are giving away a free Arduino UNO to one lucky subscriber of our Arduino discussion group. Tell your friends, join the group, and discuss all things Arduino. If the giveaway is popular, we may continue giving away free Arduino "stuff".

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Add Speech capability to your Arduino

Give your Arduino the ability to talk with the Speakjet Chip!

From http://www.practicalarduino.com/projects/speech-synthesizer:
Synthesized speech was for a long time the Holy Grail of computing, and back in the 1980s when a 4MHz CPU made your computer the fastest machine in the neighborhood it just wasn't practical for software to create intelligible speech. In those days the only sensible way to generate speech was to offload the task to dedicated hardware because the CPU simply couldn't keep up. The most widely used speech chip through the 80s and early 90s was the famous SPO256A-AL2, the allophone speech processor.

Building a Furnace Flame Sensor

Using a Arduino as a furnace or boiler controller is fairly simple. You need a thermostat, a flame sensor, and a set of relays (electromechanical or solid state) to control the blower or circulator(s), and fuel pump if using fuel oil, or gas valve if using natural gas or propane.

A tutorial on CdS cells is at http://www.ladyada.net/learn/sensors/cds.html,

relays at http://www.glacialwanderer.com/hobbyrobotics/?p=9,

and temperature at http://www.ladyada.net/learn/sensors/tmp36.html

See our thermostat project at http://www.instructables.com/id/The-Arduino-Weather-Station-Thermostat/